Bringing front-line lending efficiency to back office operations

Process automation isn’t a new concept for the mortgage industry. Over time, lenders have realized that the processes – new loan and renewal – are very paper-intensive. Not to mention, there’s a lot of sending documents back and forth among lenders, support staff and underwriters. So, naturally, they did something about it. In many cases, that something was software, a combination of document management, imaging, workflow and process management. However, that’s where the efficiency stopped – the front-office. Lenders found the competitive advantage they were looking for, and that was enough. Today, it’s not enough anymore.
A new kind of “Leader?”: Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

A new kind of “Leader?”: Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

The Gartner Magic Quadrant (MQ) for Enterprise Content Management (ECM) is, at once, the most influential, misunderstood and misrepresented assessment of the ECM marketplace. I know this well because, for the past six years, I’ve had the pleasure of being Hyland’s principle point person for articulating our position in the MQ and other analyst reports to customers, prospects and partners. To a large degree I owe my role to the sales departments of “BIG ECM”: IBM, EMC, Oracle and Open Text. You see, these vendors are tenured members of the MQ Leader quartile. Hyland Software, on the other hand, retained an exclusive position in the Challenger quadrant for five, consecutive years from 2005 through 2009.
Transactional content management: The rising star in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

Transactional content management: The rising star in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

According to Gartner, the ECM market can be divided into four subsets. * Transactional Content Management (TCM) (a system of record for managing process-related documents) * Social content management (team collaboration extended by social media tools) * Online channel optimization (WCM, digital asset management and social media tools serving as systems of engagement) * ECM as infrastructure (domain of IBM, Oracle and Microsoft) While the MQ graphic continues to represent an aggregate view of the ECM market, vendor placement is now better aligned (not perfectly mind you!) with each vendor’s strengths in one or more sub-segments of the ECM market.
The human in government human services: When document management comes to the rescue

The human in government human services: When document management comes to the rescue

Working for housing and community development agencies gave me many glimpses of health and human service agencies, both governmental and non-profits. As a result, I know many case managers, folks who’ve dedicated their professional lives to helping others through programs like homeless prevention, nutrition, vocational rehabilitation and foster care. What’s so hard about dedicating your life to this profession? The job itself is a challenge: these case managers deal with a never-ending line of people, people who are in the throes of the most difficult and painful human experiences. If you can believe it, actually doing the job is sometimes even more difficult. The regulatory complexity for their efforts – establishing eligibility for various types of assistance – is off the charts. While it’s formulated that an unemployed person needs temporary financial assistance, access to some food, eviction prevention and job retraining, the actual process to access those programs is needlessly complicated.
“I don’t care if you can afford to buy and install the initial software licenses, can you afford to run the system?

“I don’t care if you can afford to buy and install the initial software licenses, can you afford to run the system?

In my last post, I said that CFOs are asking IT the question in the title of this piece when it comes to enterprise software. The lifetime, total-cost-of-ownership of IT investments can no longer be an afterthought; it has to be a deciding factor when evaluating new technologies. I see this new way of thinking as being a good thing, applying to the world of transactional document management and document-intensive process management solutions.
Does risk trump ROI when making enterprise IT investments?

Does risk trump ROI when making enterprise IT investments?

I'm attending the Gartner ITxpo/Symposium this week. Each year, conference sessions feature a healthy mix of hot button issues purportedly keeping CIOs and IT managers up at night. This is my seventh year attending Symposium. In the past, the angst projected by session topics felt somewhat manufactured, in my opinion. This year is different. The angst appears genuine. And, it's very concentrated on a few key issues, issues that are undoubtedly driven by the fallout of a lingering and far-reaching recession. It's evident from the sessions that CEOs and CFOs are casting a harsh spotlight on IT. CEOs are looking for IT to help them innovate and achieve organizational goals in the face of regulatory and market forces that are increasingly complex, dynamic and systemic. In light of the CEOs demands, CFOs are putting the CIOs' feet to the fire with respect to:

Making ECM meaningful for today’s CIO

It’s Gartner Symposium week, dubbed the largest gathering of CIOs and senior IT managers. So far, most of the themes are centered on cloud, context, calculated risk and technology flexibility. But from the keynotes to the presentations, one thing’s been clear: there are new pressures that CIOs are dealing with. And those pressures are significantly changing their roles and how they handle IT. Case in point – technology flexibility. There are competing issues here. Larger vendors are locking organizations into their stacks through enterprise deals that organizations may or may not need. And, the bulk of these deals isn’t in the software – it’s in the customization through services that comes after the deal. But the business landscape – one that CIOs have to be more in tune with – is in constant motion, meaning that technology has to be ready to move and change when necessary. Obviously, these issues have huge implications when it comes to total cost of ownership.