Category: Digital Transformation

Digital Transformation

Making ECM meaningful for today’s CIO

It’s Gartner Symposium week, dubbed the largest gathering of CIOs and senior IT managers. So far, most of the themes are centered on cloud, context, calculated risk and technology flexibility. But from the keynotes to the presentations, one thing’s been clear: there are new pressures that CIOs are dealing with. And those pressures are significantly changing their roles and how they handle IT. Case in point – technology flexibility. There are competing issues here. Larger vendors are locking organizations into their stacks through enterprise deals that organizations may or may not need. And, the bulk of these deals isn’t in the software – it’s in the customization through services that comes after the deal. But the business landscape – one that CIOs have to be more in tune with – is in constant motion, meaning that technology has to be ready to move and change when necessary. Obviously, these issues have huge implications when it comes to total cost of ownership.
What the heck is content management?

What the heck is content management?

In the city that never sleeps, making sense of content management just got easier. Or at least that’s the intention. So here I am at the AIIM Roadshow in New York City. (If you’ve never been to one, it’s the perfect setting to get acclimated with the ECM lingo and vendor landscape.) And as I’m setting up the booth, the PR and marketing side of me took over. I’m always interested in how different companies related to ECM position what they do. While it was a limited sample size, there was one common denominator in the language: Content management.
It’s not how many applications you have to solve a problem – it’s how well they (and ECM) work together

It’s not how many applications you have to solve a problem – it’s how well they (and ECM) work together

In my last post, the focus of the convergence of ECM was on the people. Now, it’s back to the technology. Remember when I said “ECM: The convergence of processes, people and information”? I forgot one, very important part: systems. In the commercial VOGUE meeting, I had a chance to talk with Paul, who works for a large manufacturing company that just recently started using ECM. I asked him that if he could give someone advice who was looking for an ECM solution, what would it be.

Integrating ECM and other systems: First consider “how people (want to) participate in the process?”

In any given organization, one thing’s for sure: everyone needs access to information and processes. It’s the question of “how do people get to the information and processes?” that differs from department-to-department, person-to-person. I sat with several folks in government this morning during their breakfast meeting. And much like the question in the last paragraph, a hot topic of conversation was “how are different people in their organization getting to the stuff in ECM?” The reality is this: most often, ECM acts as middleware in this kind of situation. It’s the back end document and process management that sits under whatever system is considered primary to a user. As a result, many people don’t even know they’re using ECM. And that’s perfectly fine.
ECM: The convergence of processes, people and information

ECM: The convergence of processes, people and information

“What, would you say, ya do here?” I hope you’re a fan of the movie “Office Space.” This line is one of my favorites – the company is downsizing, and a long time employee is interrogated about his seemingly misunderstood and undefined role. And interestingly enough, I think this scene has a lot to do with a topic that I’m also a fan of – enterprise content management (ECM) software. To me, it’s sometimes viewed by outsiders much like the guy in “Office Space” – misunderstood and undefined.

IT and the ECM user: The same person?

I spent part of today in the commercial vertical OnBase group of user experts (VOGUE) meeting. Remember what I said about ECM being the convergence of people (among other things)? Well, I’m one for one so far with my theme. During one of the presentations, the presenter stopped and asked how many IT people were in the room. Then, she asked how many were the people actually using the technology. The room was split 50/50. And then, she threw a curveball: “How many act as both IT and the user?” About a third of the room proudly raised their hands.