Category: Digital Transformation

Digital Transformation

Welcoming Hyland’s 10,000th Customer

Welcoming Hyland’s 10,000th Customer

This morning, employees were introduced to Hyland Software’s 10,000th customer, Glen Raven, a global leader in performance fabrics, headquartered in Glen Raven, N.C. We celebrated with applause, a cascade of balloons, the energizing rhythm of a drum line from local high school, St. Martin de Porres, and a visit from Rick Cartner, executive accountant with Glen Raven, and Jim Wanner, president of authorized OnBase value-added reseller KeyMark, who helped us mark the milestone. Ten thousand. Wow.
Amazon’s Cloud Collapse: Know Your Cloud Terms – IaaS, PaaS and SaaS

Amazon’s Cloud Collapse: Know Your Cloud Terms – IaaS, PaaS and SaaS

In my last post, we explored some of the conditions that caused Amazon’s cloud to collapse. Today, I’d like to broaden the discussion with the intent of highlighting some important lessons that buyers can apply when evaluating cloud providers. I’ll also reflect a bit on how this experience has impacted Hyland’s SaaS platform, OnBase OnLine. Can this IaaS, PaaS, SaaS stuff I keep hearing people talk about protect me from future service failures in the cloud? Actually, yes it just might. As Ron McClellan has previously evangelized, the cloud is part of a larger spectrum of deployment methodologies and customers should be free to choose the deployment option that best aligns with their organizational needs. That means rejecting “all or nothing” thinking by considering all the available options. This even includes moving back and forth between the extremes or building hybrid systems that comprise both on premises and hosted components.
Amazon’s Cloud Collapse: The Blame Game and the Future of Cloud Computing

Amazon’s Cloud Collapse: The Blame Game and the Future of Cloud Computing

Several days after an isolated network failure within Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) cascaded into their most significant service outage to date, it’s clear that the event will generate a series of critical questions about cloud computing that will echo across conference rooms around the globe in the coming days, weeks and months. Who should we blame? It’s human nature to ask this question first, even though it is a completely illogical starting point for analysis. But, most of the media coverage on the incident has been focused on asserting blame, like Justin Santa Barbara from FathomDB who said that “the blame here lies squarely with , who 'guaranteed' a contract they then broke.” Others, like, Alan Perkins from Cloud81 proclaim “Just because systems are moved to the cloud doesn’t mitigate the responsibility to ensure mission critical outages are mitigated. If a business has a use-case that cannot tolerate down time then that business needs to architect their solution in a way that prevents downtime. ” After all, the availability limitations of Amazon’s Elastic Block Store (EBS) have been well documented for at least a year. The trouble is…they’re both right.
Choosing an ECM Solution-Directions Now Included

Choosing an ECM Solution: Directions Now Included

If your perception of enterprise content management (ECM) is that it is complicated, a little bewildering and probably difficult to implement, you’re not alone. Hundreds of companies could benefit from ECM, but don't, because their vision of ECM is exactly the same as yours. You know whose fault that is? Ours – along with every other vendor in the ECM market. We make it complicated. Paper floods, version controls, application functionality, document lifecycles – we talk in industry jargon and marketing speak, and what the Trekkers call technobabble. All that chaotic communication causes confusion, and gives you the perception that ECM is hard. Well guess what. That perception is wrong. ECM isn’t hard - when you have all the right information. And we want to prove it.
A Tale of Two Content Management Conferences: AIIM/info360 and Gartner PCC

A Tale of Two Content Management Conferences: AIIM/info360 and Gartner PCC

In the past two weeks, I attended AIIM/info360 in the nation's capital, immediately followed by a west coast enterprise tech party at the Gartner Portals, Content and Collaboration (PCC) Summit in Los Angeles. Both events cover a broad range of topics and technologies under the ECM software market umbrella. However, the two conferences have historically offered very different perspectives - each focused on opposing ends of the ECM technology spectrum.
Don’t Just Pave the Cowpaths With ECM – Evolve the Process

Don’t Just Pave the Cowpaths With ECM – Evolve the Process

I was visiting a customer recently, looking over their deployment and helping them architect for the next business process they are going to optimize. It was a lot of checking things off, because all the geeky details of the IT deployment were well-managed, robustly designed, and expertly administered. While the deployment was going smoothly, some things about the way that the business process was working bothered me. These problems are something that I see all too often. “Self,” I thought. “These mistakes are being made far too often. You should write about it so that you can see more new ones.” What I’m talking about here is transactional content management (TCM), or using an ECM solution as a system of record for transaction- and case-driven business processes. Massive returns on investment are right there, and days can be saved in business processes when business processes are optimized with TCM. But, to achieve the best returns, it’s not just new software that has to be installed – it’s new thinking, too.
Gartner PCC, Day 1: Work-Life Integration 2.0 – The Empowered User

Gartner PCC, Day 1: Work-Life Integration 2.0 – The Empowered User

Our work and consumer worlds are colliding. But I'm not talking about how our experiences as consumers are making us want the same devices at work as we have at home (which is still very true!). At the keynote session of Gartner Portals, Content and Collaboration (PCC), Gartner Fellow Tom Austin shared a new way to think about this work-life integration conundrum that even Dilbert is experiencing in this cartoon. Just like Dilbert, we all have lives outside of work. But, our roles as consumers (life) and employees (work) the lines are being blurred more and more. That blurring is apparent when we, the business people, are also the consumers who are demanding these changes in business. What changes are we asking for?