Author: Ken Burns

A Tale of Two Content Management Conferences: AIIM/info360 and Gartner PCC

A Tale of Two Content Management Conferences: AIIM/info360 and Gartner PCC

In the past two weeks, I attended AIIM/info360 in the nation's capital, immediately followed by a west coast enterprise tech party at the Gartner Portals, Content and Collaboration (PCC) Summit in Los Angeles. Both events cover a broad range of topics and technologies under the ECM software market umbrella. However, the two conferences have historically offered very different perspectives - each focused on opposing ends of the ECM technology spectrum.
Live From info360 Is ECM Morphing Into the Platypus of Enterprise Software

Live From info360: Is ECM Morphing Into the Platypus of Enterprise Software?

If the session content being presented at the AIIM/info360 conference over the past two days is any indication, it appears that strong environmental factors (AKA, the market) are driving ECM vendors into a period of significant evolution and adaptation. Now you may be thinking: “Ok Burnsy, I get the idea that ECM vendors and their products need to evolve. But, c'mon dude, where are you going with the Platypus analogy? What does an egg-laying, venomous, duck billed, beaver-tailed, otter-footed mammal have to do with ECM software?” The answer to that lies in the usage scenarios ECM solutions are increasingly expected to address.
AIIM and Info360-Systems of Record vs. Systems of Engagement

AIIM and info360: Systems of Record vs. Systems of Engagement?

I'm spending the next day and a half in Washington, D.C. attending the info360 conference (formerly known as the AIIM Conference & Exhibition). This has always been the showcase event for all the vendors and technologies that fall under the enterprise content management (ECM) market umbrella. At its core, however, the big focus has been on ECM offerings that support transaction processing and formal record keeping (i.e. systems of record).
Best in KLAS rankings are out: Three trends in healthcare ECM software

Best in KLAS rankings are out: Three trends in healthcare ECM software

Every year at this time, KLAS, a healthcare IT analyst firm, releases vendor rankings within several technology categories, including what they call “Document Management and Imaging.” The rankings are based on vendor-specific customer feedback. But every year, when I open it and look at the data points, I wonder “vendor ratings are great, but what does this really mean for the state of healthcare ECM today?” So if you’ll indulge me, here are the three things that that I think stand out in this report: 1. It’s not document management and imaging anymore – it’s enterprise content management (ECM). This has always been a peeve of mine. While the report calls it “Document Managing and Imaging,” KLAS knows well that, today, ECM isn’t just scan, store and retrieve – it’s routing patient charts, integrating with an electronic medical record (EMR), etc. And, because ECM should be ubiquitous throughout the organization (for example, not just in the back office), it is therefore a long term, strategic investment. The market verified this in the report. One of the ratings was if the technology was a “part of long term plans.” The leaders in the report had very high marks here, including Hyland’s ranking where 100 percent said it was a part of long term plans (disclosure: I work for Hyland). 2. What’s increasingly becoming the most common point of entry for ECM in healthcare? Integrating with the EMR. In other industries, most of the paper and process pains are felt in accounts payable and human resources, so these areas often drive ECM strategies. But the customer comments in the report made it clear that, in healthcare, the priorities are elsewhere: the clinical side.
Transactional content management: The rising star in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

Transactional content management: The rising star in the Gartner Magic Quadrant for ECM, 2010

According to Gartner, the ECM market can be divided into four subsets. * Transactional Content Management (TCM) (a system of record for managing process-related documents) * Social content management (team collaboration extended by social media tools) * Online channel optimization (WCM, digital asset management and social media tools serving as systems of engagement) * ECM as infrastructure (domain of IBM, Oracle and Microsoft) While the MQ graphic continues to represent an aggregate view of the ECM market, vendor placement is now better aligned (not perfectly mind you!) with each vendor’s strengths in one or more sub-segments of the ECM market.