Author: Kaitlin McCready

Four IT Security Lessons to Learn From Anonymous’ Stratfor Hack

Four IT Security Lessons to Learn From Anonymous’ Stratfor Hack

On Christmas Eve, while most of us were immersed in the holiday spirit, others were immersed in the sensitive information of Stratfor Global Intelligence Service’s client list. A group of hackers, associated with the collective known as Anonymous, breached Stratfor’s systems, obtaining the credit card numbers, passwords and home addresses of the company’s customers. The group has already used this stolen information to make donations to charities, such as the American Red Cross. (This story keeps evolving as new information is released. For the latest updates, check out The New York Times topic page on Anonymous here.) Breaches like this are happening so frequently (just follow the medical community for the evidence) that they’re becoming ho-hum. But that’s even more reason to question how they can happen in the first place. This is 2011, after all, and technology in organizations should, in almost every case, protect against something like this. To help you ensure you don’t become the next Stratfor, here are four lessons in IT security that you can take to your organization.
Where’s the relationship between customer service and enterprise IT at ACORD LOMA?

Where’s the relationship between customer service and enterprise IT at ACORD LOMA?

As is the case with every technology tradeshow, there’s usually that overarching, bigger picture pointing to why technology is important. Healthcare – better patient safety and care. Government – better constituent service. Credit unions – better member service. You get the picture. It’s all about whomever the industry segment defines as its customer. Maybe I’ve been too busy tweeting and blogging, but I’ve only heard the word “customer” a handful of times at ACORD LOMA this year.
ACORD Standards-Connecting the dots between systems to drive innovation

ACORD Standards: Connecting the Dots Between Systems to Drive Innovation

This is my third ACORD LOMA. As usual, Gregory Maciag kicks it off in the Monday keynote by talking about the value of ACORD standards. But this year, instead of focusing solely on the structure that standards can provide to insurance companies, Mr. Maciag took a different approach – innovation to drive improvement. It was clear that the presentation wasn’t just about education – it was persuasion. From the video clips of insurance technology leaders that were shown, it seemed like ACORD was trying to combat the image that standards are restrictive. So instead, Mr. Maciag spoke to the message of “these aren’t standards for the sake of standards.” Rather, it’s the “fragmentation between systems that allows for innovation. ACORD standards connect those dots, magnifying the innovation.”
HIMSS 2011 Day 1-Systems That Work Together Work for Healthcare

HIMSS 2011 Day 1: Systems That Work Together Work for Healthcare

The first day of HIMSS 2011 has come to an end, and it’s certainly been a much different feel than last year. Last year, it was about meaningful use of patient information. But today, attendees seemed to be focusing on a more actionable question – how? As one reporter that I spoke with put it, no one system is going to do it all. Healthcare organizations must realize this. Once they do, their priorities shift to focus on ensuring multiple systems work together. From the patient care perspective, this is where interoperability plays in a big way. I had the opportunity to visit the Interoperability Showcase yesterday, and my tour was focused on an event that happened that needed to be documented and archived in a static form. What struck me most in what the three vendors showed was what was implied – this is an optimal situation, and isn’t something that’s happening now universally when there is IT in place.
HIMSS Day 1, Part II: What About the Cloud?

HIMSS Day 1, Part II: What About the Cloud?

What’s my favorite part about HIMSS? You never know who you’re going to run into. Waiting for the hotel shuttle yesterday, I ended up having a conversation about the future of healthcare IT with none other than the founder of Quality Systems Inc. and NextGen, Sheldon Razin. Sheldon is the classic entrepreneur – he knows so much about a field – healthcare IT – and wants to share it with anyone who’ll listen. So, naturally, he lit up when I asked him, “What do you think is the future of healthcare IT?”
What the heck is content management?

What the heck is content management?

In the city that never sleeps, making sense of content management just got easier. Or at least that’s the intention. So here I am at the AIIM Roadshow in New York City. (If you’ve never been to one, it’s the perfect setting to get acclimated with the ECM lingo and vendor landscape.) And as I’m setting up the booth, the PR and marketing side of me took over. I’m always interested in how different companies related to ECM position what they do. While it was a limited sample size, there was one common denominator in the language: Content management.
Part II: Bringing the work to the worker (in government)

Part II: Bringing the work to the worker (in government)

I caught up with Fran (again, don't judge my video skills), who works in the IT department at a city in the western U.S. I wish I had chatted with her before adding the last post - she was all about offline ECM capabilities! Off camera, Fran mentioned many, many more field workers that could benefit from offline capabilities. In particular, she serves the Parks and Recreation department, so the first two that came to mind were the people who make inspections, such as to playgrounds, as well as the tree trimmers.