Author: Kaitlin McCready

Four IT Security Lessons to Learn From Anonymous’ Stratfor Hack

Four IT Security Lessons to Learn From Anonymous’ Stratfor Hack

On Christmas Eve, while most of us were immersed in the holiday spirit, others were immersed in the sensitive information of Stratfor Global Intelligence Service’s client list. A group of hackers, associated with the collective known as Anonymous, breached Stratfor’s systems, obtaining the credit card numbers, passwords and home addresses of the company’s customers. The group has already used this stolen information to make donations to charities, such as the American Red Cross. (This story keeps evolving as new information is released. For the latest updates, check out The New York Times topic page on Anonymous here.) Breaches like this are happening so frequently (just follow the medical community for the evidence) that they’re becoming ho-hum. But that’s even more reason to question how they can happen in the first place. This is 2011, after all, and technology in organizations should, in almost every case, protect against something like this. To help you ensure you don’t become the next Stratfor, here are four lessons in IT security that you can take to your organization.
Managing New Content in New Ways-ACORD LOMA Goes Mobile

Managing New Content in New Ways: ACORD LOMA Goes Mobile

The people that come to ACORD LOMA already have one thing figured out: Enterprise IT is instrumental to managing the lifeblood of their insurance organizations – information. But, just when they thought they had these enterprise IT systems all figured out, guess what changed? Information. I’m talking about the explosion of content as consumers can be their own publishers, from taking photos to posting reviews and comments on the businesses they interact with.
Where’s the relationship between customer service and enterprise IT at ACORD LOMA?

Where’s the relationship between customer service and enterprise IT at ACORD LOMA?

As is the case with every technology tradeshow, there’s usually that overarching, bigger picture pointing to why technology is important. Healthcare – better patient safety and care. Government – better constituent service. Credit unions – better member service. You get the picture. It’s all about whomever the industry segment defines as its customer. Maybe I’ve been too busy tweeting and blogging, but I’ve only heard the word “customer” a handful of times at ACORD LOMA this year.
ACORD LOMA 2011-Collision of New and Old Technology

ACORD LOMA 2011: The Collision of New and Old Technology

“In insurance, we’re in the business of information. We can’t afford to have the wrong technology to manage it.” On Sunday, I had the pleasure of hearing John McCormick, Group Editorial Director for Insurance Networking News share his experience interviewing an executive from the Hartford Group. It was the quote above that really opened Mr. McCormick’s eyes to how the insurance industry is so closely married with technology. Fast forward to this year’s ACORD LOMA. That long-standing relationship between insurance and technology is experiencing a never-before-seen battle of push and pull – between new technology and old. I think PropertyCasualty360.com reporter Mark Ruquet described it best in Sunday’s show daily:
ACORD Standards-Connecting the dots between systems to drive innovation

ACORD Standards: Connecting the Dots Between Systems to Drive Innovation

This is my third ACORD LOMA. As usual, Gregory Maciag kicks it off in the Monday keynote by talking about the value of ACORD standards. But this year, instead of focusing solely on the structure that standards can provide to insurance companies, Mr. Maciag took a different approach – innovation to drive improvement. It was clear that the presentation wasn’t just about education – it was persuasion. From the video clips of insurance technology leaders that were shown, it seemed like ACORD was trying to combat the image that standards are restrictive. So instead, Mr. Maciag spoke to the message of “these aren’t standards for the sake of standards.” Rather, it’s the “fragmentation between systems that allows for innovation. ACORD standards connect those dots, magnifying the innovation.”
HIMSS 2011 Wrap Up: Why ACOs are the push that will drive data – unstructured and structured – to work together

HIMSS 2011 Wrap Up: Why ACOs are the push that will drive data – unstructured and structured – to work together

Instead of putting my post-HIMSS evaluation to paper…err blog…right away, I let it simmer. I read every media outlet recap, rehash and regurgitation of the event. And, without surprise, the most popular three letters were ACO (accountable care organization). The excitement of ACOs at HIMSS was well-warranted – after all, the model could potentially revolutionize the way that healthcare is performed and achieved. But, although HIMSS is clearly a healthcare IT organization, I was a bit disappointed that the implications for healthcare IT were only mentioned in passing. Since I’m guessing I’m not the only one in this boat, here’s my evaluation of it, taken from media, attendee and analyst meetings. To start, let’s just say that if you thought “meaningful use” incentives were driving healthcare IT adoption, you haven’t seen anything yet. The proposed ACO model means that compensation is based on keeping costs down and improving outcomes. In other words, doctors would be thrilled to have consistent, accurate data that’s readily available. With all of these drivers in place, the ramifications are clear: the time has come that unstructured and structured data working together is an absolute must. As one of the analysts put it during a meeting we had at the show, “unstructured data is coming of age in healthcare.”
HIMSS Day 2 Recap: Mobile Isn’t Just About Receiving Information – It’s About Storing Information

HIMSS Day 2 Recap: Mobile Isn’t Just About Receiving Information – It’s About Storing Information

Across all industries, there’s no doubt that mobile is a hot topic. In the ECM world, we’re thinking about how we can keep those individuals that do much of their work away from a desk – claims adjuster, government field worker, etc. – as connected and as seamlessly involved in the process as possible. In healthcare, it’s usually the idea that a physician could use a mobile device similarly to how they use a pad of paper. But, with a device, it’s not only about inputting information, but also retrieving already stored content to make better decisions at the point of care. This idea came up regularly, both in conversations with attendees and the media. There are a lot of questions about whether this would ease or complicate what the IT folks are trying to accomplish – get the right technology in place and get physicians to use it. But, to the attendees of this year’s HIMSS, mobile also took on a different connotation.
HIMSS 2011 Day 1-Systems That Work Together Work for Healthcare

HIMSS 2011 Day 1: Systems That Work Together Work for Healthcare

The first day of HIMSS 2011 has come to an end, and it’s certainly been a much different feel than last year. Last year, it was about meaningful use of patient information. But today, attendees seemed to be focusing on a more actionable question – how? As one reporter that I spoke with put it, no one system is going to do it all. Healthcare organizations must realize this. Once they do, their priorities shift to focus on ensuring multiple systems work together. From the patient care perspective, this is where interoperability plays in a big way. I had the opportunity to visit the Interoperability Showcase yesterday, and my tour was focused on an event that happened that needed to be documented and archived in a static form. What struck me most in what the three vendors showed was what was implied – this is an optimal situation, and isn’t something that’s happening now universally when there is IT in place.